I Love Water!

heartShow how much you heart-512x512_thumb.png water by stepping into your bathroom and making a few simple changes for big water savings. Bathrooms are water hogs, accounting for over half of the daily water used in the average home. The EPA estimates about 30% of our indoor water use goes toward flushing a toilet! Another 17% is used in the shower. By taking a few simple actions, you can reduce the amount of water you use in your bathroom.

Go with the Flow, Man!

Exchange your current showerhead for a low-flow showerhead. Some showerheads made before 1992 use up to 5.5 gpm (gallons per minute). If you are worried about sacrificing water pressure for water savings, you have nothing to fear. Low-flow showerheads of today must have a gpm of 2.5 and have a water pressure of 80 pounds per square inch (psi). This means the showerhead will perform as well or better than standard models. An added bonus to replacing your showerhead can be found in energy savings. Using less water means you need less energy to heat the water. A win-win!

Get to know your potty
water sense_thumb.gif
Products with this logo meet EPA WaterSense criteria for efficiency and performance.
Replace older, inefficient bathroom fixtures and
calculate how much you can save!

How old is your toilet? Toilets made before 2002 can use anywhere from 3.5 – 5 gpf (gallons per flush). If you are not sure how many gallons your toilet uses per flush, look inside the tank for the gpf number stamped inside. Toilets on the market today use 1.6 gpf. If your gpf number is over 1.6, consider replacing the toilet with a new water efficient toilet. The EPA estimates a family of four can save an average of $2,000 in water bills over the lifetime of the toilets.
While looking for the gpf, also inspect your toilet for leaks. Leaking toilets are common and can be a large source of water loss. A leaking toilet can waste several gallons to more than 100 gallons a day!

You might have a leak if:
  • You have to jiggle the handle to make the toilet stop running
  • Water trickles down the sides of the bowl after the toilet has been flushed
  • Your toilet makes noise when not being used
  • Water dripping out of the refill tube into the overflow pipe

Leaks are often very easy and inexpensive for the average homeowner to repair on his or her own.  So, Conserve: WATER U waiting 4?