Corridor Study Comments - Prince Avenue

The comments below were submitted to the Planning Department regarding the Corridor Study for Prince Avenue (these comments have not been edited).


What are the visual conditions and/or quality of life aspects along the corridor that you most value?
  • Trees
  • Walkable conditions
  • Historic preservation
  • Building heights / footprint size
  • Mixed use character of existing corridor
  • Restrictions on signage
  • Walkability
  • Lack of big box stores
  • The fact that Prince doesn't look like it could be any suburb in the United States due to anonymous strip malls
  • Neighborhood orientation
  • Passing people on the street and stopping for conversations
  • Ability to walk to dinner
  • Diverse businesses
  • Pedestrian scale of buildings
  • Sidewalks
  • Easy accessibility to necessary services including medical facilities
  • Restaurants
  • Transportation choices
  • Bikeability
  • Intimately scaled architecture
  • Close to diverse residential areas
  • Availability of public transportation
  • Biking to work, school and leisure activities
  • I love that Prince is wide and flat with good visibility as you walk along it on the sidewalk. The trees along the sidewalk are gorgeous. It's just such a picturesque street (in spots, at least).
  • In much of the corridor there is a wide grassy verge with trees between the roadway and the sidewalk
  • The Normaltown business district has maintained an interesting mix of local businesses
  • I love the sightlines and the trees that blossom in the spring and turn colors in the fall
  • The beautiful homes and public buildings in the corridor
  • The walking or biking to local businesses along Prince Avenue
  • This corridor is a main vein into Athens. The shift from Highway 129/Jefferson Hwy to Prince Ave should be pronounced. The Prince Ave Corridor should reflect the priorities of our community: support of small businesses, UGA and ACC partnership, green spaces, ample and safe spaces for pedestrians and cyclists. I love to see families walking or riding bikes to and from Chase Street School. This activity exemplifies the kind of community in which I want to live.
  • I really enjoy the local businesses that continue to thrive along Prince Avenue. I also appreciate the new businesses arriving, and the fact that they are using already existing structures (such as an old gas station or a historic building) rather than constructing new ones. The wide sidewalks lined with trees are pleasant. I love that a good use was found for the old Prince Avenue Baptist Church when it was sold to Piedmont College a few years ago. Perfect!
  • I value the historic buildings and trees and I want to see them preserved. I also value some of the businesses, most notably Daily Groceries Co-op, Avid Bookshop, The Grit, and Normal Bar.
  • I like the bike zone, as I use it all the time. Seems a good compromise between cars and bikes.
  • Safe street crossings
  • Shops
  • I love the part of the corridor that stretches from the Grit to the frame store along the Southern side of Prince (and includes Avid Bookshop and the Daily Groceries Co-op), as well as the Normaltown shops near Satula/Oglethorpe. I'd love to see those shops, sidewalks, and trees extended throughout Prince avenue, and eyesores like those fast food chains replaced by local businesses, and larger groceries.
  • Besides the road-side trees, grass verges and sidewalks, I like best the architecture of those parts that are older commercial properties used in a quiet way. e.g., The Grit, the Daily Grocery and the two sides of the one block of Normaltown where the hardware store is. The two kinds of use make a pleasant old-timey combination.
  • I appreciate Prince from a visual standpoint, with the street trees and historic buildings (commercial or residential). I'm a big fan of local businesses / small businesses and Prince has evolved as a place for businesses to locate to service surrounding neighborhoods as well as other parts of town. The stretch of small businesses from the Grit to Daily (with Bottleworks in between) and the Normaltown area have both improved over the years.
  • I enjoy the mixed-use activities on Prince: shopping, dining, and services are convenient to get to. I often walk or ride my bike if possible.
  • I love the dogwoods that line the road, I love the wide sidewalks with the median, the lit pedestrian crosswalks with the signage are also very helpful. The old buildings and historic properties also enrich the neighborhood. The small businesses that line the district are also the lifeblood of the area and extremely important.
  • I like the local businesses such as The Grit, Daily Grocery, and Avid Bookshop. I also like the proximity to the Boulevard and Cobbham neighborhoods.
  • The walkability and the variety of businesses there.
  • Trees,well lit streets and efficient traffic flow.
  • I walk, bike, motorbike, drive, and/or walk my children down Prince everyday. I most value to mix of businesses and the pedestrian & bike traffic.
  • Safe bicycle paths. SAFE PEDESTRIAN CROSSINGS.
  • It's hard to like a street with so much fast-moving traffic but I do enjoy the small businesses in Normaltown, although getting to them sometimes feels like a life threatening experience (as a pedestrian).
  • The greenery and historic buildings along the road.
  • Tree canopy & the old neighborhood aspects of the area.
  • We love the proximity small businesses that we frequent along Prince (Taqueria del Sol, Grit, Normal Bar, Avid Bookshop, Daily Groceries, Healing Arts Centre, Ike & Jane, Normaltown Hardware) - and the fact that they are close enough for us to access by walking and/or riding bikes. We value having frequently used services very close to our home. We even walked to almost all of our prenatal appointments at the ARMC Midwives. We value the Farmer's Market and playground at Bishop Park - and other green spaces and playgrounds that are within walking distance.
  • I value all of the following aspects: sufficiently wide bike lanes, traffic calming measures, continuous sidewalks with curb cuts, unobtrusive (small!) signage for businesses, clearly defined crosswalks with blinking lights strips and blinking signs to warn drivers, consistent and diligent policing of crosswalk laws,
  • My family and I value being able to walk, bike, and bus downtown and being able to support local businesses. We enjoy walking and biking to Ike and Jane's, the Normal Bar, Normal Hardware, Agua Linda's. I love the new Social Security building that was built in our neighborhood. The builders clearly valued protecting the neighborhood and creating something aesthetically pleasing in the landscaping as well as the building itself-and we got a sidewalk!!
  • I most value the small shops. I miss Allen's but really like the cluster of Mexican restaurants and groceries that moved in. A few trees are nice, but I don't prioritize "visual conditions." Heck, we already have a landscaped McDonald's--but it's still a McDonald's.
  • The village feel that is generated especially around Normal Town and Grit area by the cluster of services and in Normal Town by the parking and pedestrian walks. We need to keep Prince a place for PEOPLE TO WALK AND LIVE
  • Historic buildings (Normaltown businesses in attached buildings and antebellum houses), trees, sidewalks, businesses with daily amenities (cafes, groceries, hardware)
  • Pedestrian prioritization, safety, and connectivity. Mixed uses, particularly neighborhood services. Traffic calming and better bike lanes. Changes to zoning and codes that reflects new urbanism principles
  • Trees, Wide verge, Old houses, Local places to eat, drink and shop
  • I value the tree canopy, especially in the summer, that Prince has already, and would love to see more.
  • fun businesses. would love to see this develop more.
  • I like the businesses in Normal Town and the quiet neighborhood streets, which occur because cars going to and from Athens stay on Prince rather than driving through the neighborhoods.
  • Trees, trees, trees
  • Sidewalks, trees, mix of businesses, preservation of at least some of the historic buildings, clusters of activity such as in Normaltown, Bottleworks - these are some of conditions/aspects of Prince Avenue that beautifully announce the entrance to Athens. Love the diversity of people - lifestyle, age, income, race and ethnicity - in the neighborhoods around Prince Avenue Corridor. Being able to walk to downtown, the hardware store, restaurants, etc.
  • Historic buildings, local businesses, pedestrians, cyclists and dogwoods
  • bike lanes
  • Tree cover, especially in area of old Navy School, Numerous historic structures, Business nodes at Normaltown, Bottleworks and the Grit/Go Bar (but not fast food franchises, all of which are ugly), ARMC campus looks pretty good, despite parking crowding road and sidewalk
  • Walk-ability and bike-ability are important for me on this corridor. A denser commercial district in the normal town area would be visually more appealing and would improve my quality of life.
  • Sidewalks, trees bordering corridor, mix of commercial and residential.
  • The primary quality-of-life aspect is walkability. Desirable visual conditions include the surviving historic structures and green plantings -- especially street trees.
  • pavement and plenty of lanes
  • safe, walkable streets; trees and plantings that are not an afterthought but rather planned to enhance their built surroundings and thus given adequate space and attention; different textures, colors and shapes of the built environment (buildings)
  • Trees, pedestrian walkways, smaller scale buildings, less medical buildings (huge, towering buildings), smaller businesses
  • I enjoy being able to walk to grocery stores, a bar, and restaurants. I even enjoy the playhouse and large beautiful houses.
  • I greatly appreciate the scale and aesthetics of the Normaltown area with Aqua Linda, Normal Bar, Ike and Jane. These neighborhood scale businesses promote my walking from my house to socialize with my neighbors.
  • I love the small town feel of the Normal Town area. Downtown Athens is mostly bars and it is not conducive to take families. Also, the downtown smells like urine and beer. So, with that said the Prince Ave. corridor gives access to shopping and restaurants without the undesirable party atmosphere.
  • I love being able to walk to so many unique places of business. Ike and Jane, Normal Bar, Agua Linda, Normaltown Hardware- they make our area a thriving community and I'm grateful we don't have chains in their place. I am thrilled that I can do so much shopping on Prince Avenue, from Avid Bookshop, Athens Art and Frame, and the Daily Co-op. The trees are beautiful in the spring and the varied architecture adds to the uniqueness of the road.
  • Pedestrian Safety, Tree Lined Streets, Traffic Calming, Walkability, unique local businesses
  • I really appreciate the ability to walk from my home near Oglethorpe Avenue through Prince Avenue to downtown. Nearly everything I need is on Prince Avenue: groceries, home supplies, and wonderful restaurants. I enjoy the trees along Prince Avenue and the historic buildings.
  • Wonderful sidewalks, large trees, homes and businesses set off at a distance from the sidewalk so that there are large lawns, or manicured landscaping (basically the openness/rather than the closed in feelings such as downtown etc. Prince is the flattest road in Athens and best for walking jogging/biking etc.


What are your top concerns about the future of the corridor?
  • Fix medical office loophole 
  • Graceful transition from commercial to residential, i.e. no parking deck across from residential. 
  • Reduce car traffic
  • More bike trails/lanes
  • More greenspace
  • More pedestrian-friendly, even close to the loop. For example, near the Social Security Admin building.
  • Degree of medical complex development (aside from UGA HSC)
  • Traffic speeds
  • I hope future development will avoid more fast-food chain establishments, especially drive-thrus. Even just the signage is incompatible with the historic character.
  • It is turning more and more into a speedway for people who really ought to be on the bypass if they want to go that fast
  • Large buildings that do not serve local concerns, huge buildings too close to road, high speed of traffic, too many curbcuts and driveways that make it dangerous to walk, we need a grocery store nearby (1140 Prince?!).
  • Improperly scaled development, loss of historic structures, high speed and greater volume of traffic would greatly decrease pedestrian/bike safety, establishment of medical college will mean greater pedestrian traffic in Normaltown/Navy School area and opportunity for economic development.
  • As a neighborhood resident (and frequent walker and driver on/across Prince), I am concerned about having to navigate Prince on my own. But as a business owner, I am profoundly worried about my customers, particularly those crossing from Emmanuel Day School to my bookshop at 493 Prince Ave (adjacent to the Heritage Foundation). I worry in particular about slower-moving pedestrians, such as my older customers and children. I fear it's not a matter of if but WHEN someone is grievously injured (or worse) before the year is out.
  • There is economic pressure to build massive medical office buildings that could kill all mixed use in the corridor.
  • Safety for pedestrians and bicycles.
  • Too many cars at too high a speed making it even more dangerous to be a walker/cyclist
  • Physical appearance of the PAC should reflect the small town feel that is currently present on much of Prince Ave. Pedestrians and Cyclist need to be able to travel safely on Prince Ave. especially when children and families are traveling across Prince to get to and from school. There needs to be a way to slow traffic down as cars come into Athens.
  • Transportation: how do we find balance between those who drive into Athens and those who walk or bike? I have not yet biked on Prince Avenue; that is a challenge that takes some mental preparation for me. I remember first learning to drive on Prince Avenue years ago, and the (comparatively) narrow lanes and high traffic made me nervous then. Later I cursed the casual bicyclists who "chose" to drive during rush hour on Prince Avenue, whom you kept having to pass again and again. And now that I live in town and commute more by bike than by car, I'm not sure I can bicycle up and down Prince and feel safe, remembering my attitudes as a driver ;-)
  • I do not want to see buildings (too tall, too wide, too close to the curb) that do not fit with the scale of the neighborhood. I do not want to see more large parking lots. No more expansion of ARMC. Surely the hospital has done more than its share to ruin the look of the corridor. I also want to see traffic-calming on Prince that would make it more bicycle and pedestrian-friendly. Cars drive too fast on Prince Avenue and that needs to change.
  • Attracting businesses to it without destroying the roads viability for bike riders. I won't be able to use it if I have to compete with traffic from a Walmart for example. However, I can go an alternate route if it's in the best interests of the community to increase car traffic on Prince. Won't be the end of the world! ;)
  • The car traffic is already a big problem. People drive too fast, never signal when they switch lanes and are completely oblivious to pedestrians and bikers. Perhaps if there were more development on the Northern side of Prince there would be more street-lights and pedestrian walkways and traffic would be calmer. But it's not safe to cross Prince on foot or on bicycle, even with the addition of flashing crosswalk lights. I've been walking along prince or in my car and seen so many cars speed through a blinking crosswalk, while a pedestrian hurriedly scoots back to the safety of the curb. Creating more pedestrian walkways, bike and bus paths, adding traffic calming features and more stop-lights, lowering the speed limit and
  • Maintaining the character of the areas described above (the architecture of those parts that are older commercial properties used in a quiet way. e.g., The Grit, the Daily Grocery and the two sides of the one block of Normaltown where the hardware store is). Anything that can be done to make the rest of the corridor look like those areas instead of what those other parts now look like (growing office buildings with no style; fast food parking lots and traffic) or are likely to look like soon (even more of that), would be great.
  • I am very concerned that Prince remains very dangerous, trying to be both a high-speed artery to those trying to get from Point A to Point B as well as a commercial and residential corridor that is increasingly accessed by foot, bike, and transit. Compromises are going to have to be made. The biggest problem is speeds but the people opposed to lane reduction complain the most about having to slow down. Policing and high-tech crosswalks only have limited impact and lane reduction is the only way I can see that the locally-controlled "extension of downtown" stretch can be made safer to cross. In fact, there's no better example of a road Athens where two-lane with a center turn lane configuration should be in place. This configuration has improved Millege, Lumpkin, and Baxter for all users including vehicles who now have easier turning into businesses and fewer accidents (at least according to the study following the Baxter conversion a decade ago). Study or no study, the roads feel remarkably safer following conversion, for driving, crossing, and riding a bike. Unfortunately road reconfiguration has been negatively politicized and the naysayers often have little understanding of the tremendous benefits that can be achieved for vehicle-, pedestrian-, and bike-safety by: A) making the road "self-policing" (the car in front of you sets the speed, as it's one lane each direction), B) making the road crossable without fancy features (you only have two traffic lanes to cross with a turn lane to pause in), and C) improving the cycling environment through the addition of bike lanes and reduction of traffic speed. The Hawthorne reconfiguration years ago is still haunting Prince. People feel angry because something seemed imposed on them that has negative perception from their business standpoint (though really a lot of the problems are inflated and as a driver I believe Hawthorne is a better street on that section). I hope that this perception can be changed and plan to work with other citizens to reeducate the public on this issue. Stay tuned (fingers crossed : )
  • I am concerned that out of scale medical development/office space may dominate the scene. We need to maintain and encourage the mixed-use feel of the place. I also would like some sort of 2 lane system with bike paths to be considered. I think some of the through traffic from Jefferson Road to the east side could be routed onto the bypass and exited onto Lexington Road- there needs to be better signage so that folks can understand HOW the loop works. As one person said- it's the only loop you have to get off to stay on.
  • Losing any of the above characteristics of the neighborhood (dogwoods, wide sidewalks, lit pedestrian crosswalks, old buildings, historic properties, small businesses) or having a substantial increase in traffic in the area.
  • I would like it to be more pedestrian-friendly, like an extension of downtown.
  • That it will be over developed without any concern for pedestrians, bikers and folks who live nearby
  • Very concerned that changes in traffic flow such as changing to three lanes on any portion of Prince Ave would adversely affect businesses and commercial development . Health care is reported to be the second largest employer in Clarke Co after UGA. We are fortunate to have a medical school campus and development along Prince will be needed to support growing medical community. Restrictions to building office space need to be very carefully evaluated and allow for growth in this important industry.
  • Traffic needs to be slowed and throttled as it comes into downtown. A center turn lane with two travel lanes and two bike lanes seems quite reasonable given the bike and pedestrian traffic on the street. Plus the street is in the midst of an ever denser urban environment once it from Milledge to Pulaski.
  • We need to slow the traffic down. Prince Avenue is not just a funnel to downtown and the UGA campus.
  • Biggest concern is that traffic calming measures will never be put in place.
  • Ensuring it is walkable and bike-rideable. Right now, between Pound Street and the access road just north of the loop it is very dangerous to ride on Prince - south of that point it's possible to ride on parallel roads and north of there the access road makes avoiding Prince possible, but there is no way to get safely between those two points if you're heading north on Prince.
  • Tree canopy. and dilapidated uninteresting mid century buildings & sparse parking lots with no trees.
  • Pedestrian and bike safety and accessibility - traffic calming - tree canopy
  • Designing infrastructure solely around "gameday" concerns, neglecting to increase bus service and other form of public transit -- the BLVD. street car was a great idea, one that should be resurrected for the length of Prince Ave. -- widening avenues without regard to historic buildings and residents quality of life, letting UGA determine the development around the new Health campus. It's OUR town, and the infrastructure / development should serve Athens citizens as well as students.
  • Biking can be frightening. Drivers are going too fast. I don't understand why we can't have a center turn lane or median to slow drivers down and make room for true bike lanes. There is no safe way for bus riders to cross Prince to get to the beautiful new bus stop across from our street. I would also like to see sidewalk extended on the places where we have gaps along Prince. I am worried about walking or biking my kids to school from our house to Chase St.
  • That it will be given over to massive institutional projects with park-like landscaping. This may look pretty, but it will suck the life out of a neighborhood.
  • More high speed traffic and even less consideration for pedestrians and cyclists. It is already a huge problem but making the road wider and cutting down on pedestrian zones is going to cause more accidents/ more speed/ less care of those who LIVE and WALK and BIKE in the district.
  • Pedestrian/bicycle safety and connectivity; need to reduce auto speeds
  • Scale of buildings is and will be too large. Uses such as medical buildings will not promote street life or contribute to neighborbood. There will continue to be more parking lots in front of buildings. Vehicles will continue to be prioritized over bikes and peds. Speeding will continue. Planning won't stay ahead of poorly planned development that takes advantage of outdated codes and zoning.
  • Speeding traffic, Pedestrian safety, loss of small businesses
  • It needs to be safer for pedestrians to cross. Some drivers still ignore the lights on crosswalks. I think it would be helpful to have raised bumps on the painted lines of a crosswalk so that drivers realize that they are driving over a crosswalk and that they need to be mindful of pedestrians.
  • I don't want my kids to get killed in a crosswalk! I've almost been hit on Prince 3 times - in crosswalks, being careful. And this is the norm! Seems like just a matter of time before someone gets hit, and with all the little kids in the hood - esp. by Emmanuel - and new businesses it is just amazing that it is this bad! I know people freak out about increased neighborhood traffic - but I'd gladly have hundreds more cars on my street if it meant Prince being safer for pedestrians.
  • I believe that 3-laning Prince, which some of the more vocal residents in this neighborhood want, would slow traffic and thereby increase congestion and, in the long run, drive cars through the neighborhood. Prince is a major corridor into town and needs an unimpeded flow of traffic. Many who drive in on the road do not live in Athens and so don't attend these meetings. In addition, Bike Athens does a great job of turning their people out, which, unfortunately, gives them an impact on planning beyond their numbers. Looks at Hawthorne and beware!
  • Beautification, especially used to slow traffic. Good examples are found in Greenville, SC.
  • The significant demands and changes that the move of UGA to the Navy School campus, the development of even more medical-related offices and services, the move of St. Joseph Church will bring to the corridor. The continuing emphasis on cars as the sole, or at least primary mode, of transportation along the corridor. That the AC Commission will not be proactive and do the short and long term thoughtful planning needed in order to ensure the continue vitality of the corridor.
  • 1) Too much automobile traffic traveling too fast; Prince needs a road diet from Normaltown to downtown. 2) I want ACC to encourage development that: puts parking behind the buildings (not between the building and Prince), requires bike parking at all new construction, and requires quality sidewalks 3) If a road diet isn't possible, Prince needs raised crosswalks, traffic islands, and law enforcement stings for speeding and failure to yield to cyclists/pedestrians.
  • lack of bike lanes
  • Destruction and low-quality redevelopment of remaining historic properties, Conversion of lawns and limited greenspace/tree cover into parking lots and/or buildings, Continued deterioration of several low-quality structures, including the old Subway/dermatologist's office and the auto service center across from ARMC, That well-meaning traffic calming measures such as jut-outs will make the corridor even more dangerous for cyclists, I'm also concerned about how the present site of St. Joseph's Catholic Church & School will be used when they relocate.
  • I would not like to have (visually) historic qualities of this corridor become overrun by a car dominant strip mall form.
  • I am not opposed to increased density as proposed, but am concerned with maintaining and improving design standards.
  • My greatest concern is that vehicular traffic will increasingly dominate the corridor.
  • lack of pavement, lack of lanes
  • too much of of the corridor dedicated to medical so that the character and charm of the area are washed out
  • Traffic... We live a block off of Prince Avenue and are very concerned about traffic with the new school. Please consider the flow of traffic in this area and do not let it become like Five Points!
  • I think pedestrian safety in crossing Prince Ave. is very important. It is a major barrier to pedestrians right now. I have definitely not crossed the street to visit stores or friends because it was too much trouble to cross Prince.
  • Increasing traffic due to medical offices and commuters make biking and walking dangerous. This will only increase as more people move to Athens and the periphery.
  • Traffic needs to be slower and their needs to be more pedestrian crosswalks to access restaurants and other shopping.
  • I'm concerned that developers will come in and change a very special part of our community. Right now we have small businesses, local restaurants, and residences existing very well together. If we permit bigger (i.e. huge medical) complexes on Prince, this will change our neighborhood permanently, and not for the better. Traffic will increase, it will be even more unsafe for pedestrians and bikers, and the visual appeal of Prince will be adversely impacted. There are so few community areas in Athens outside of downtown and Five Points- Normaltown and the area near Avid books are really the only other ones. I worry that A-CC claims they are interested in tourism, and being a great retirement area, and yet we're considering compromising one of the reasons people are drawn to the area; unique businesses, walkability, and great quality of life.
  • Pedestrian Safety, Traffic calming is desperately needed, this corridor should not be treated as a quick way to get Downtown as that is what Atlanta Hwy./Broad Street was designed for. There are neighborhoods and soon to be two College campuses on this street once the UGA HSC campus is complete and those students and residents need to feel comfortable walking up and down this avenue.
  • I would like to see caps on parking and building size that would make this area feel more like downtown. I would like to see all planning developed in a way that embraces a 20-30 year vision for future growth. Just like drivers downtown drive slowly, we need to slow down traffic. I do not want to see vehicle traffic pushed to the neighborhood streets like Boulevard, Hill, and Cobb. In a perfect world, Prince would be equally safe for pedestrians, bicycles, and cars. I enjoy traveling on my bicycle, but perhaps Prince Avenue is not the place for biking. Perhaps the culture needs to shift and our bikers need to use Boulevard, Cobb and Hill. I do however strongly feel that Prince needs to continue having unbroken sidewalks for walkers. I would like to see all future parking hidden with landscaping and perhaps behind commercial/business buildings. More green space in general would benefit the area. I would like to see incentives to occupy vacant buildings. All new structures should have architecture similar to the styles downtown.
  • The air quality to remain clean because of the exercise aspect above/increasing the traffic would be a huge loss and compromise the health of citizens.


What are the visual conditions and/or quality of life aspects along the corridor that you least value?
  • Utility poles
  • Prince Avenue becomes more difficult to navigate as a pedestrian west of Chase Street; as drafts of the study noted, the sidewalk ends on the north side at some point where it is particularly difficult to cross (i.e. you must backtrack considerably).
  • Crosswalks have short pedestrian "walk" timers; during rush hour you almost need to jog when cars are trying to turn.
  • People running through crosswalks as if that pedestrian wasn't even there-- seeing close calls like that, whether it involves people I know or not, is always disconcerting
  • Speed of traffic, lack of parking that is shared, out of scale development.
  • 3-laning Prince scares me unless there is significant traffic calming done on Boulevard, Grady and Lyndon since we already have too much cut-through traffic.
  • Fast food/strip mall, large buildings (3+ stories), lack of shade in some areas, too wide - 4 lanes encourages high speed (bike lanes / pedestrian islands needed)
  • The speed of the vehicles, the lack of bike lanes.
  • Lack of safe pedestrian crossings. Intersections designed to promote free-flowing vehicular traffic rather than pedestrian safety, e.g. the right turn lanes from King onto Prince and from Prince onto Pulaski. The Prince-Talmadge-Park intersection is a pedestrian nightmare.
  • Abandoned buildings (New Dry Cleaners, former Subway, etc.)
  • Chain restaurants, multiple lanes of traffic, (the turn lane in the center seems like something important to maintain), torn down buildings, speeding traffic, cars that do not stop at crosswalks, poor sidewalk conditions.
  • I noticed in the study that there was a plan to limit drive-thrus. I understand this. Coming in and out of the Wendy's and Captain D's near Bottleworks, which is also near an intersection, is very difficult (both on the driver, the on-coming traffic, and the people on sidewalks passing by). I have enjoyed these establishments, so I hope there is a way to compromise.
  • Cars driving too fast, the dangerous parking spaces in front of Normaltown Hardware, where you cannot see if you're backing out into high speed traffic. The dangerous intersection at Pope and Prince, where you cannot see oncoming traffic when trying to turn onto Prince. The fast food restaurants, as well as a lack of safety walking in the neighborhood at night. Also, from Oglethorpe to the Perimeter, especially, it is a thoroughfare that feels more like a highway than a neighborhood. Finally, if there were more businesses open later in the evening, that would help with safety and also energize the corridor. I don't want to see a lot of bars open up in the area, but Normal Bar has been a positive addition and an additional bar or two may be assets. More locally-owned and operated restaurants would be a positive addition, as well as retail outlets that remain open until 9:00 or 10:00 in the evening.
  • Potter's House always looks like a trash heap--cloths stacked outside of the donation bins, donated furniture etc. that's dropped off during non-business hours stacked in front of the store, etc. There's also that abandoned ex-laundry on the corner of Barber and Prince that looks like, well, an abandoned building.
  • It's SO HARD to cross Prince! It makes Cobbham feel completely divorced from Boulevard. Plus, it's not really much fun to walk on foot past all those nasty-smelling, car-filled drive-in fast food restaurants. The high speed limit makes it unsafe and dangerous to pedestrians and bikers, along with the paucity of street-light crossings. If I want to walk to Rite Aid, or from Daily Groceries to Normal Hardware, my walk is not really all that pretty, and I have to negotiate traffic and figure out where to cross. Mostly I just see lots of cars and fast-food restaurants. I'd rather see pretty traffic calming features and more of a swath of businesses I could patronize. I love Normaltown and the Cobbham stretch of Prince (from the Grit to Daily Groceries). It's what's in between that's the unsafe eyesore.
  • The new monolithic office blocks and fast-food joints with large parking lots and no sense of the historic place they've been plunked down in, and no reference to the architecture of that place. The fast food architecture that is the same. There is no reason the existing buildings could not have been, and the new buildings certainly to come can not now be required to adopt an architectural style in keeping with the older parts of the street.
  • The biggest problem relating to quality of life are that Prince divides rather than unites surrounding neighborhoods due to its behavior as a high-speed artery and not a central commercial corridor oriented to pedestrians. Car speeds need to be slowed through traffic calming measures built into the design and the road needs to be genuinely crossable. The Normaltown area is a concern with the new medical college and with an increase in businesses. Pedestrian-protection measures are needed here even if it remains more of a traffic artery than a "downtown street" style. Fast food drive through restaurants are unappealing to look at but acceptable on this amazingly diverse street which has everything.
  • Dangerous speeding conditions, especially for pedestrians and cyclists. Nasty fast food signage.
  • The fast food restaurants, the large unsightly parking lots, the buildings that were built inexpensively and have no real character or value.
  • Cars driving fast. Hard to cross the street. Not pedestrian friendly.
  • I don't understand this question
  • Overhead power lines, dilapidated store fronts.
  • Car traffic moves to fast from Pulaski to Milledge. More stop lights are needed to continually slow traffic, particularly where the pedestrian crossings now exist. Many drivers disregard the crossing signs when the lights are on and as more people use them it seems that it is only a matter of time before an accident occurs.
  • Wimpy pedestrian crosswalks.
  • This is a very ambiguous question. Examples would be helpful. What are you getting at?
  • The on-street front-end parking - it's unattractive to me and makes both bike riding and driving in the Newtown area hazardous. The only saving grace is that it is very rarely utilized.
  • Gas stations, fast food establishments, and run-down building with no architectural appeal. *ALSO, establishments like St Joseph's Church & School should not be allowed to cut down 100+year old hardwood trees as they've done numerous times on both Prince Ave AND Childs Street. As the study says there are many places along the corridor which have preserved a tree canopy, and note that St Joseph's is not one of them: "There are many sites along Prince Avenue with excellent front yard canopy: the home of Joseph Henry Lumpkin, Emmanuel Episcopal Church, the UGA President’s House, the Taylor Grady House, the ARMC outpatient surgery facility, Young Harris United Methodist Church, the medical facility at 1010 Prince Avenue, SunTrust Bank, Athens Primary Care, and the Spine Center.." It seems as though ACC has hired arborists in the last few years who've done a great job at preservation, so why has this church been allowed to cut down massive living Live Oaks that provided canopy to Prince and Childs?
  • Fast Food and other drive-through establishments - offices that close in the early evening - making areas of the corridor feel relatively unsafe and un-trafficked - lack of safe crosswalks - lack of safe bike lanes - large parking areas right up against the road in front of buildings - lack of shade trees along the sidewalks
  • Convenience for drivers: make Prince a bad choice for drivers who are speeding to the other side of town. Lower the speed limit; 25 mph would be fine all the way to Whitehall Rd in fact.
  • Businesses with no landscaping or beautification. Fast, unsafe driving. Gaps in sidewalk coverage.
  • The bridge between Prince and Jefferson Road that lacks enough room outbound for a bicycle. This was a project that never should have been built the way it was. I'm not crazy about the monster medical stuff either, but I guess doctors have to locate somewhere.
  • The speed of cars, fast food restaurants and general "highway" appearance and look of the historic street.
  • Onsite parking visible from street or between sidewalk and buildings; low-rise low density buildings esp fast food; fast moving traffic
  • Single use office complexes Too many gas stations Front facing parking Vehicle speed and dominance Large scale medical complexes Lack of green
  • Speeding traffic
  • Multiple drive-through restaurants with drivers who very quickly want to zip in and out before and after they get their meals, and are often not paying attention. Large swaths of asphalt, for example in front of Huddle House. Real estate that has been vacant for years, a.k.a. Bottleworks.
  • that hideous parking lot at corner of barber. even some perimeter plants would go a long way.
  • I don't like mid-block crosswalks. I have walked 25,000-30,000 miles since I've lived in this neighborhood, so I know a lot about walking, as well as driving. Mid-block crosswalks are unsafe no matter how much signage you put up, and they are extremely confusing for drivers. They usually occur in areas with businesses, which means drivers are watching cars already in lanes and cars pulling into lanes. They have to look at stop lights, stop signs, etc. Adding flashing lights and crosswalks adds confusion and makes an already distracting driving situation more so.
  • Fast Food restaurants. Large, bright signs, ie. the insurance office on the northern side of Prince Avenue near the Loop.
  • The traffic volume and speed, the conditions of the sidewalks (width, absence of verge, curb height, dangerous cross walks), outsized commercial spaces with street front parking and no landscaping, the overall challenges of adequate parking, the lack of accommodation for alternative transportation - bus, bicycle, foot. The long stretches of the corridor that have no green space.
  • Traffic, high number of curb cuts & buildings set back from the street
  • keep trees and greenery
  • Overhead wires, Difficulty crossing Prince on foot. Difficulty bicycling on Prince, especially where the east-bound lanes narrow between Hawthorne and Sunset and through the areas where on-street parking is permitted. The vacant area around Marti's at Midday looks awful. The north side of the Barber Street intersection, especially the Potter's House parking lot and (now vacant) Huddle House. I hope Emmanuel will redevelop this area with an eye toward making it more functional and visually appealing. In places, the sidewalk is too rough to be safely used by people in wheelchairs, kids on bikes, etc.
  • I have little value for parking lots.
  • Parking lots on Prince are an eyesore. Buildings with poor aesthetics. I do not insist on traditional building styles, but rather quality of design and construction. I would love to see fast food outlets leave the Prince corridor.
  • The worst thing about Prince Avenue, for me, is auto-centric commercial development, with its frequent curb cuts and barren expanses of asphalt driveways and parking areas.
  • non-intersection-based pedestrian crossings.
  • boring, standard, and cheap-looking "brick and tan" buildings that do not add to the uniqueness of Athens
  • Larger buildings, traffic, traffic, traffic (see a trend here?)
  • The highway-like aspect of Prince Ave.
  • I do not like the fast food restaurants, particularly because of the dangerous traffic that are constantly turning in and out of them. I also do not like the large medical buildings that block views and create more traffic. I understand the need for medical offices, but there must be caps on this single use on a diverse corridor.
  • I wish there were more small boutiques and restaurants and places for small businesses to flourish. More trees need to be planted on the corridor and trash/leaf removal from the curbing needs to be addressed.
  • The traffic is very intimidating. I have an enormous dog and I wear bright colors, but when we try to cross Prince Avenue, we might as well be invisible. Cars are going way too fast. Once you are out past the Navy School heading toward the loop, the area becomes ugly and you could be in anywhere-USA. This is not a look to be emulated- we need to shy away from this type of development, yet I fear that instead, developers want to run toward it. I wish it were safer to bike on Prince. I like to bike, but feel it's unsafe to do so unless on small neighborhood streets.
  • fast trip time Downtown, chain fast food restaurants, associated medial business that are not doctor offices (i.e. medical supply businesses, uniform shops, etc.)ample parking
  • It is difficult to cross Prince on foot. I would like to see vacant buildings used.
  • Just the automotive storage or whatever around where the subway moved into a garage or gas station. There’s all kinds of junky cars out front of lots around there and it looks very tacky.


Do you have any other comments about the corridor or the draft of the corridor study?
  • I like the emphasis on historical preservation/landmarks.
  • I am also interested in seeing this extend to Hawthorne/Oglethorpe.
  • The study mentions the benefit that better connection with Bishop Park would bring. I totally agree and as a jogger would add that there is no sidewalk on Sunset on the Bishop Park (west) side at the intersection with Prince. From Prince going toward Bishop Park a pedestrian must walk without a sidewalk (i.e. on the grass) or cross at his/her own risk through traffic lanes later, after using the east side sidewalk on Sunset.
  • I wish someone could explain why it is that the narrow sidewalks on the one block stretch of Chase Street (actually named Prince Place) has to also have telephone/utility poles in the middle of them. That is a really treacherous piece of road for a pedestrian or a biker, especially on the way to school with a child. Surely we can do something better with those telephone poles rather than have them impede the sidewalk there.
  • I really like the idea of a different zoning category that addresses my concerns about development including adequate buffers for the adjoining neighborhoods.
  • I would like to see shared parking areas - it is so silly to see 740 Prince empty all weekend / church parking empty all week.
  • Particularly concerned about Normaltown/Navy School area - great potential for economic development but as is it is very pedestrian unfriendly. Area between Park and Oglethorpe really needs pedestrian islands to make for safe mid-block crossing.
  • I want to reiterate how concerned I am for myself, my friends, and my customers. I have heard that some local business owners do not want Prince to change because they fear calming traffic will result in lower sales. I could not disagree more. I am a big fan of the PPS (Partnership for Public Spaces) and other such organizations that focus on making centrally-located parts of cities and towns accessible and safe for ALL. I am confident that making Prince safer, particularly the strip between Milledge and Pulaski, will enhance my business and the others that are around me. This is a neighborhood street and should not be treated as a speedway.
  • All aspects of the study -- not just right of way improvements -- should be implemented first for the inner part of Prince Avenue, from Pulaski to Milledge. GDOT control is not an issue for this part of the corridor, which is becoming increasingly urbanized. It is now part of downtown!
  • Trying to cross Prince on foot.
  • Thank you for undertaking this.
  • The corridor needs an assortment of diverse shops, restaurants, and office space. It's my understanding that rents can be quite high, thereby making it impossible for many talented entrepreneurs to make a contribution to improving the corridor. Perhaps the city could provide incentives that would defray rental costs, at least for an introductory period of time, until a business can establish itself. Now that Avid Bookshop is occupying half of the space formerly occupied by Dree, it is essential to get a business in the remaining half. The space is crying out for a cafe or coffee shop. If that space were occupied, that stretch would be pretty much perfect. A full grocery store in the area, ideally in the space vacated by Winn-Dixie, would be a great addition. I don't think the General Dollar Store expansion sounds like the right fit for the neighborhood. I would prefer to see a Whole Foods or Publix in that space.
  • No, seems to be primarily a commercial corridor which is one of the main ways in to downtown Athens. It works well right now and, as a bike commuter, I don't think 3-laning it is the way to go. Keeping it 'as is' works fine as long as you clean up some of the businesses along it (the ones I mentioned previously).
  • The Prince Avenue Corridor lies between three up-and-coming affluent, upper middle class neighborhoods: Boulevard, Cobbham, and Normaltown. With the development of the UGA Medical Sciences Campus at one end, and Downtown at the other, the corridor OUGHT to be a bridge to these neighborhoods, but instead it cuts through them and divides them. This needs to change: we need to re-imagine Prince as something that CONNECTS these neighborhoods, but that will only happen if we make it more pedestrian and bike-friendly, and THAT will only happen if we develop it further. This is an opportunity to court more businesses that might better serve the upwardly mobile/ yuppie Cobbham, Boulevard and Normaltown communities. Why not a Whole Foods? 1000 Faces Coffee in a cafe setting! A wine store! A cheese store! A clothing store for women over 30! A toy store for kids!-- all of these are things that Athens currently lacks and the Boulevard/Normaltown/Cobbham community could easily sustain, given those neighborhoods' average age of 30-something, and high number of graduate degrees. We should be actively lobbying to bring these businesses to Prince Avenue, and then to implement more pedestrian plazas and walkways to cement this community's walkability and in turn help Athens' local economy grow and flourish.
  • A Whole Foods would really flourish on Prince Avenue. Yes, it would bring more traffic, but it would do well here and would serve the Boulevard/Cobbham/Normaltown community in the same way that Earthfare serves Five Points. Five points inhabitants would continue to patronize Earth Fare, and Boul/Cobb/Norm folks wouldn't have to drive to Five Points to buy their free-range meat and fancy olive oil. If it were placed between Milledge and Chase, it would be far enough from Daily Groceries that there wouldn't be much competition. Most people who patronize Whole Foods would continue to patronize the co-op. A second Earth Fare would be a nice option, too, but Whole Foods has more higher quality specialty items and would therefore fulfill a need in Athens, especially with the recent closing of Gosford Wine.
  • I wonder if others have thought of encouraging the Prince Corridor to be more like Five Points? That intersection has a little bit for everyone and is the center of the community there. Prince Ave. Corridor has a unique chance to be a Five Points for a slightly older, more family and less student-oriented population.
  • 1) Pedestrian crossings: The pedestrian crossings at The Grit, Daily Grocery and Piedmont College are worse than useless. They are designed to kill. The only safe way to cross is to ignore them and wait -- sometimes for a long time -- until there are no cars in sight. Cars almost never stop at the crosswalks, even when people are in the middle of the street in the crosswalk. My guess, having looked many drivers in the eye as they missed me by inches, is that there are several problems: much of the time when the tiny crosswalk lights are flashing there are no pedestrians present (because the duration of flashing is set for slow people, who are few), which extinguishes any inclination to slow down. Then there is the sun at morning and afternoon commute times which blinds drivers to the tiny lights. The only real solution is a pedestrian-activated red light (green at all other times and preceded by yellow when activated) with a duration set quite short. 2) Bikes: an impossible equation to solve. Bikers deserve safe routes. If SPLOST puts in bike lanes, car traffic on the 3 remaining lanes (unless you tear out the trees and grass verges -- what a terrible idea!) will be much worse and, with all the curb cuts, biking will be as unsafe as with those ridiculous "Share the road" signs. But putting bike lanes on Boulevard will not serve as an alternative: what commuter from between Broad and Prince to downtown would regularly ride all the way to Boulevard and back along Barbour in order to traverse a few blocks in beauty and relative safety? Not many.
  • As I've touched a lot on pedestrian safety, I want to add that there used to be a perception that Prince was hard to cross so crosswalks were added. Now the crosswalks are viewed as the problem due to a false sense of security they provide. The primary issue before crosswalks and now is that people want to cross the street and need to cross the street. This need is only going to increase as Prince continues to build its business base. It's GOOD that people want to cross Prince. Crosswalks are GOOD but they work best with one lane in each direction or else at traffic lights. Two lanes of traffic each direction with a crosswalk but without a red light is a recipe for trouble, even with flashing lights, sensors, police monitoring, etc. The cheapest, simplest, best option is what I outlined previously. We just need to change the perception that what has worked so well on Milledge, Baxter, and Lumpkin is somehow a problem on the local-control section of Prince. It's a fantastic solution that will work equally well on Prince.
  • I think we as a community need to lay the groundwork now for the future of this corridor. The decisions that are made now are ones we are going to have to live with for a long time. If we stick with the status quo, it will only encourage folks to stay in their cars for short trips and to have to get into their car for longer trips because they can't get needed services locally. This will cause an ever increasing demand on vehicle infrastructure and there's only enough room for so many lanes of so many cars.
  • After attending the meeting last night, one of my main concerns is that the discussion of the Prince Ave. corridor will disintegrate into a discussion of three-laning Prince Ave. instead of focusing on the more important decisions about zoning, appropriate building design, green space development and right of way design. Please try to keep the corridor study from getting bogged down in that divisive discussion. It is but a very minor part of the real issues that need to be addressed.
  • Please save the area for pedestrians and those of us who live and work in the neighborhood.
  • I think that if we start planning now, Prince Avenue between Milledge and Pulaski could become like an extension of downtown. This would make these blocks of Prince much more attractive businesses that benefit from walk-in traffic. It would also strengthen the Boulevard and Cobham neighborhoods, because there would be a lot more available within walking distance.
  • Please don't allow for overly dense development at intersections that are already over-stressed. the re-striping of Pulaski is already a cluster-mess and seems poorly thought out. please be diligent in looking at traffic patterns as they are now and what changes you are thinking about making that would alter those. be smart!
  • While I agree that all modes of transportation should be considered, I think entirely too much time and discussion devoted to bicycles.. Prince is commercial corridor. I would favor parallel approach to bike lanes on nearby streets. To try and have both bike lanes and efficient corridor will likely end up with neither being satisfactory? Need much more input from business owners along Prince Ave before decisions taken.
  • The core of Athens needs to be tamped down. We don't need texting SUVs barreling down the streets of our fair city. Please slow everyone down.
  • Just crossing Prince is my biggest concern. It negatively impacts my quality of life to have to (as a pedestrian/ bike rider) cross a street that is more dangerous than it should be or has to be. I sometimes walk my daughter to Chase St. School and the inbound traffic from Clarke Suburbs and Jackson County comes in way faster and more aggressive than it should. Calming measures should be in place well before traffic hits Normaltown. One thing you could do now and very economically to make Prince safer would be to put signs and other calming measures on Oglethorpe for vehicles that are about to take a right turn onto Prince, warning them of the potential for tragic encounters with Pedestrians (such as the accident that occurred in front of Ike and Janes a few months ago). Pedestrians sometimes cross in the middle of the street there; it looks clear, the light at Oglethorpe and Prince is red, but a fast moving car suddenly appears (seemingly out of nowhere) off of Oglethorpe as it makes a right turn onto Prince. I had a close encounter of that sort myself once.
  • It seems as though ACC has hired aborists in the last few years who've done a great job at preservation, so why has this church been allowed to cut down massive living Live Oaks that provided canopy to Prince and Childs?
  • I support 3-laning Prince Avenue. - I wish we had a really great grocery store closer to our home - right now we drive to Earthfare, Trader Joe's and Kroger on Alps.
  • The Prince Avenue corridor, with proper zoning, could become a natural extension of downtown with the unique character of Normaltown and Cobbham. Value these neighborhoods, invest in the Athens human resources, build more public spaces/ green spaces, allow the community access to the historic setting of the UGA Health campus.
  • There is potential to have a truly bike-friendly, pedestrian-friendly little community in Normaltown. I would love to see the health sciences campus open up so we could use the grounds as a public park.
  • I haven't read it, just heard about it. I think bike lanes are silly, since bicyclists need to make so many left turns that lanes will be an obstacle rather than a help (the only place bicycle lanes are needed is the bridge). I also worry that far too much attention is placed on "visual conditions" (even by this survey) and far too little on functionality. I don't care what things look like, but how they function. My fear is that the results will be another postcard-pretty but pointless piece of sprawl.
  • I agree completely with the General Strategies in Section C. The proposed height restrictions need more explanation. The graphic boards at the public meeting were almost entirely ineffective/irrelevant so I hope there will be better visual materials that convey the proposed changes in an accessible way. A safe bike route is essential but keeping two auto lanes in each direction will keep speeds too high and discourage biking. We need one travel lane in each direction. Non-local traffic should take the bypass. Bulbouts, onstreet parking, and median islands are good solutions depending on the context - please research what makes great streets elsewhere rather than trying to reinvent the wheel, including protected or buffered bike lanes.
  • How will this study build on or differ from cappa?
  • Make improvements to the locally controlled part of Prince first. TSPLOST is not compatible with this plan.
  • Usable buses that come more frequently would make me consider parking at home more often. Bike lanes that don't run into parking spaces would be nice too. Thanks!
  • hope to ease parking regs for businesses. hope for a safe bike route.
  • The study claiming that 10.5% of people in this neighborhood ride bikes to work has to be false. The only way to get the .5 is to count 1000 people. That means that 105 people ride their bikes to work from this neighborhood. That's just not true. You need to be accurate and honest before you spend millions of dollars to make changes to existing roads.
  • It is a complicated report. But I would like to support the idea of beautifying the street, putting in pedestrian crosswalks, adding bike lanes, reducing curb cuts, and maintaining structures of reasonable size. I know there are issues related to cost, who controls the right of way, etc, But we should be able to have an entrance that accommodates business and safe neighborhood use.
  • I think the corridor study holds great promise - there is an opportunity both on the Prince Avenue and the Oconee corridors to become exemplars of thoughtful, integrated planning that balances the needs and demands of these rich, diverse entrances to Athens. My fear is that we will take no action and this moment of time when we have an opportunity to act will be lost.
  • I am concerned about the possible size cap for Medical Office at 10,000 square feet - matching the professional office cap. Currently, we are seeing medical groups merging and adding more practitioners. Medical groups are also including special imaging and procedure rooms at their medical practice locations. In today's medical development market, it is near impossible to fit a practice group in less than 12,000 square feet given their requirements to be competitive in the market. Desired minimum size is 15,000 square feet.
  • I have listened to much of the back and forth debate concerning Prince Avenue for several years. I have read and thought about the three-laning, medians, bike lanes, etc. However, one idea that I have not seen mentioned is the concept of making Prince Avenue a one-way street (probably out of town) and Hancock Avenue a one-way street (into town). The one way sections would extend up to Pope Street. Traffic coming into town on Prince would turn off Prince onto Pope and flow onto Hancock. Traffic leaving town would enter the one-way section at the Pulaski/Prince intersection. Thus, there would be 2 corridors associated with this corner of downtown, with opportunities for crosswalks, bike lanes, sidewalks, and parking. There may be absolute contraindications to this concept that make it completely unworkable. However, since I have never read of this consideration, I thought that I would at least contribute the idea as a possible solution to the Prince Avenue problem.
  • While I recognize that Prince/129 is a major motor vehicle transportation corridor into and out of the county, from Normaltown to Pulaski it is has a distinctive and valuable urban neighborhood character. Its topography and connectivity make it a natural route for cyclists, pedestrians, and public transit, and it should be reconfigured according to "Complete Streets" design principles to safely accommodate all of these road users.
  • Prince Avenue has a split personality. It's viewed by suburban commuters as a "racetrack" into and out of downtown/UGA, but it's also a local road serving local residents and businesses. Traffic calming would be helpful, as would better access to the inner loop (the line to turn left from eastbound Prince is horrible at certain times of day, far above capacity). I'd like to see the corridor widened to include bike lanes and better sidewalks. On-street parking should probably be eliminated unless it's possible to use parallel parking as a buffer between the motor vehicle lanes and the bike/ped lanes. The executive summary of the corridor study seems to be on track, but it provides too few details for me to assess its overall value.
  • Even though this road is a sharerow I think a painted bike lane on this corridor would help alleviate some tension between drivers and cyclists.
  • Traffic calming. I support 3-laning Prince and placing bike-lanes.
  • Whatever can be done to improve pedestrian safety and convenience in actually crossing from one side to the other of Prince Avenue would be much appreciated.
  • The pedestrian "crossing island" adjacent to Chase street medical center is an effective and attractive safety device that does not interfere with auto traffic. I have often wished for such a safety island when crossing other streets, including Prince Avenue.
  • If made into three lanes would like to know what is the alternative being planned for as to the means to get to downtown from the north side of the county. The road connects directly to HWY129 so really this shouldn't even be up for discussion again.
  • Thank you for considering these ideas!
  • I very strongly wish to see Prince three-laned and be made easier for pedestrians to cross.
  • I agree with the statement on page 53 that cyclists will use Prince and not an adjacent street. This should not be disregarded, since as a cyclist who has been hit on Prince, I still take Prince because of the directness and topography. Prince must be able to accommodate both bikers and cars.
  • I would NOT like to see building over 3-4 stories high in the area. I think larger buildings tend to make the area look like an office park. The character of that area needs to remain intact and attractive for both small business and residents.
  • I was very concerned by what I heard during the December 12 meeting. I was shocked to hear the word "arbitrary" thrown around when talking about the 10,000+/- square footage requirement. It is very scary to understand that many people seem to want no restrictions on square footage of future buildings. This would be a disaster for our neighborhood. At the same meeting, I was alarmed that there seemed to be an understanding that the area near the Grit is 'in town,' and yet I got the impression Normaltown is considered in the 'boonies' and there is less of a need for traffic calming and reduced speed limits. I hope I misconstrued this, as Normaltown is absolutely in need of traffic calming and reduced speed limits.
  • I would like to see some attention given to providing safe planted/green medians, so pedestrians feel safe when attempting to cross the street. I think these would also help with the aesthetic of the avenue and signal to incoming traffic that they are entering an area of mixed commercial and residential and need to slow down and be more aware of bike and pedestrian traffic. I would love to see this avenue made into a 2-lane street w/ bike lanes and a dedicated turn lane rather than the current 4 lanes and occasional turn lane.
  • I would like to see a cap that prevents any big box stores. I like the idea of the economic development that larger medical buildings would bring. One stipulation: traffic produced by these larger buildings must be handled in a way that is safe for pedestrians and bicycles. We could copy a zoning plan that works well in another community. We have large government structures downtown that generate traffic. Current downtown traffic is handled in a way that I feel safe walking in all of these areas. In summary, my highest priorities are: no big box stores and make this corridor feel safe for travelers on foot.
  • Keep larger footprint sized structures a good distance from the sidewalk and street (the Normaltown area where “Normal Hardware” “The Army Navy” other retail/grocery/bar/restaurant great! If these are right off the sidewalk, but not General Electric, GA Power, etc.